Keeping your Dog Safe on Walks

Why hello there Planned Property residents! One thing many urban dog owners often bemoan is the lack of grass our pets have to relieve themselves on in the city. Some patches and gardens have “No Pets Allowed” signs. Some of us ignore them; thinking it’s just a sign to keep our fur babies out. While some “keep out” signs might just be a request for dogs not to trample some decorative flowers, pet owners should be cautious, some dangerous chemicals might be hiding in those pretty decorative areas.
Researchers from Purdue University conducted a 2013 study where it was found that there was a potential link between canine bladder cancer and exposure to herbicides used to kill common weeds in lawns and gardens. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid is commonly used to treat lawns. Exposure to this increases a dog’s likelihood of developing canine malignant lymphoma.

With fall around the corner, many apartment and condo landscape managers will use snail bait to keep out snails and slugs. A common active ingredient in snail bait is metaldehyde, which is often attractive to dogs. Snail bait is used in different forms, including: pellets, liquids, pelleted baits, wettable powders, and granules. It is highly toxic to dogs, and causes: blindness, excessive salivation, seizures, and sudden death.

Organophosphates and carbamates are insecticides that can result in severe poisoning to dogs and cats. They are being used less and less yearly, however, some gardeners and landscape artists still utilize them. These insecticides are often mixed into other fertilizers or herbicides, and are commonly used by rose and flower gardeners. When organophosphates and carbamates are accidentally ingested by pets, signs owners can look out for include: salivation, lacrimation, urination, defecation, hypothermia or hyperthermia, difficulty breathing, tremors, seizures, and death.
Pesticides and herbicides that are specifically toxic to dogs include:

• Avermectin B1: A
o Used for fire ants
 Causing lethargy and tremors
• Allethrin
o Used on flies and mosquitoes
 Linked with liver cancer
• Bendiocarb
o Used to control cockroaches, ants, fleas, and crickets
 Causes: muscle tremors, chest discomfort, and excessive salivation
• DCPA
o Used in lawns and gardens
 Adverse effects in the liver of dogs
• Benomyl
o Fungicide
 Possible carcinogen and a reproductive toxin
Rodentcides for dog owners to be cautious of in both gardens, lawns, and alleys include:
• Warfarin
o Internal bleeding, reproductive toxin.
• Difenacoum and Brodifacoum
o Anti-coagulants and are both acutely toxic.
If you suspect your dog has ingested a poison, please call your vet, the Pet Poison Hotline (800-213-6680) or to your local pet emergency room. For PPM residents, the closest emergency room is located at 3123 N. Clybourn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60618 and their phone number is 773-281-7110.

We at PPM wish you and your dog long, healthy walks and to be cautious of anything hiding in gardens, flowers, and alleyways.

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